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Нудный гундос форума



Зарегистрирован: 20 Авг 2003
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Откуда: Новосибирск
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СообщениеДобавлено: 2006-08-15, 11:10  Заголовок сообщения: Ролевик Adverbial clauses Ответить с цитатойЦентр страницыВернуться к началу

An adverbial clause consists of a subject and a predicate introduced by a subordinate conjunction like when, although, because, if, etc. Such a clause may be used in initial position, final position, and occasionally in mid-position with the main verb of the sentence. A comma often appears after an introductory clause (especially a long one), but is much less common before a clause in final position. A clause in mid-position must be set off with commas.

Adverbial clauses may belong to the types of Time (1), Place (2), Cause (3), Condition (4), Contrast (5) subdivided into a/ concessive and b/ adversative, Purpose (6), Result (7), Comparison [8] and Manner (9).

Adverbial Clauses of Time (Time Clauses) begin with the subordinating conjunctions when, as soon as, while, as long as, since, by the time (that), before, now that, after, once, until, as.

I can see you when I finish my work.
She was reading a book while the dinner was cooking.
I have not seen him since he returned to the country.
They will leave before you get there.
Meanwhile, someone broke into the house and stole their silverware.

Adverbial Clauses of Place are introduced by where, wherever.

We live where the road crosses the river.
Note: Sentences like ‘Wherever possible, the illustrations are taken from literature’ are labeled as abridgements of place clauses.

Adverbial Clauses of Cause may begin with subordinating conjunctions because, since, as, now that, whereas (legal), inasmuch as (formal), as long as, on account of the fact that, owing to the fact that, in view of the fact that, because of the fact that, due to the fact that (informal).

He could not come because (or since, as) he was ill.
Now that he has passed his examinations, he can get his degree. Whereas they have disobeyed the law, they will be punished. Inasmuch as no one was hurt because of his negligence, the judge gave him a light sentence.
On account of (or owing to) the fact that the country was at war, all the young men were drafted.

Cause clauses also may have abridgements: It is an unpardonable insult, since intentional

_________________
И не мешайте мне гундеть!
________________________________________________________
Учителя открывают дверь, но каждый сам должен войти в нее.
(Китайская пословица)

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Артём
Нудный гундос форума



Зарегистрирован: 20 Авг 2003
Сообщения: 1261
Откуда: Новосибирск
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СообщениеДобавлено: 2006-09-12, 11:18  Заголовок сообщения:   Ответить с цитатойЦентр страницыВернуться к началу

Adverbial Clauses of Condition start with the prepositions if, unless, on condition that, provided that, providing that, in the event that, in case that, whether … or not.

If it rains, we won’t have the picnic. We won’t have the picnic unless the weather is good. We’ll have the picnic providing that it doesn’t rain. In the event (or in case ) (that) it rains, the picnic will be postponed.

Abridgements of conditional clauses:
Please come early if possible.
This appliance will not work unless properly attached.

In contrary-to-fact (unreal) conditions:
Present – Were I in your position, I would take advantage of that offer.
Past – Had I known you were coming, I would have met you at the station.

Adverbial Clauses of Contrast:

concessive: The subordinating conjunctions are although, though, even though, even if, in spite of the fact, despite the fact, notwithstanding (the fact) that.

Although (or Though) I felt very tired, I tried to finish the work. In spite of the fact that prices went down recently, the company made a huge profit. Notwithstanding the fact that the government was weak at that time, law and order were maintained.

Abridgements of concession clauses:
Although in a hurry, he stopped to help the boy.
Although only a boy, he does a man’s work.
Although fond of his work, he wants to find a job that will be more challenging.

adversative: while, where (informal), whereas
Some people spend their spare time reading, while (or where, whereas) others watch television.

_________________
И не мешайте мне гундеть!
________________________________________________________
Учителя открывают дверь, но каждый сам должен войти в нее.
(Китайская пословица)

 Пол:Мужской  ОтключеныЛичная галерея АртёмПросмотреть профильОтправить личное сообщениеОтправить e-mailНомер ICQ
Артём
Нудный гундос форума



Зарегистрирован: 20 Авг 2003
Сообщения: 1261
Откуда: Новосибирск
russia.gif
СообщениеДобавлено: 2006-09-19, 09:28  Заголовок сообщения:   Ответить с цитатойЦентр страницыВернуться к началу

GRAMMAR - 2.1. ADVERBIAL CLAUSES.

Adverbial Clauses of Purpose: in order that, so (informal), so that, for the purpose that
They climbed higher in order that they might get a better view.
He is saving his money so that he can go to college.

Adverbial Clauses of Result: so + adj. or adv.+ that, such (a)+ noun + that, so that
Note: so premodifies adj.-s and adv.-s. such (a) – nouns, sing. or pl.

She is so pretty (adj.) that she attracts a lot of attention.
She sang so beautifully (adv.) that everyone applauded her performance.
She has such pretty hair (noun) that we all enjoy looking at it.
It’s such a hot day (sing. count. noun) that I must go to the beach.
They climbed higher, so that they got a better view.

Adverbial Clauses of Comparison: as + adj. or adv.+ as, (not) so + adj. or adv.+ as, -er (more) + adj. or adv. + than

She works as hard as her sister (does).
She doesn’t work so (as) hard as her sister works.
She works harder than her sister works.

Abridgements of comparison clauses (very common):
She works just as hard as her sister (does).
She works harder than her sister (does).

Adverbial Clauses of Manner: as if, as, as though (especially after look, seem, etc.)

He looks as if he needs (needed) more sleep.
He hasn’t behaved as a gentleman should behave.

Abridgements of manner clauses:
He hasn’t behaved as a gentleman should.
He left the room as though angry.
The clouds disappeared as if by magic.
He raised his hand as if to command silence.

_________________
И не мешайте мне гундеть!
________________________________________________________
Учителя открывают дверь, но каждый сам должен войти в нее.
(Китайская пословица)

 Пол:Мужской  ОтключеныЛичная галерея АртёмПросмотреть профильОтправить личное сообщениеОтправить e-mailНомер ICQ
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